5 Things BOXING has taught me.

 

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MY TRUSTY GLOVES !!

Disclaimer : I am not at all a professional boxer, but, I train because I have an extreme passion for it.

Without beating around the bush I am going to get right into it.

1  You shall fall, bleed, fail… but you shall never quit:

It’s very normal to suck at somethings in life,  but that does not mean you give up. I remember breaking three toenails, spraining my hand, banging my head into a wall…. but these things just made me a better fighter. Falling is a part of rising. If you really want it, then don’t make giving up an option.

2  Avoid a fight till you can, but when it starts, don’t back down :  

Violence is not cool. Never start a fight, it’s not worth it. Even if the opponent starts fighting, try to make them submit as far as possible. But sometimes there is just no choice. In such situations, let the badass in you, shine through.

3  Practice :

You need to do it, not till you get it right but till you cannot get it wrong (thanks to pinterest for the quote !). Boxing is mostly about getting your technique right, and you can only do that by practicing it over and over and over again. This also applies to every single thing you do in your life.

4.  Fear will get you killed :

Know the difference between anxious and fear. Always remember that your opponent is also human, a liver punch is going to hurt them as much as it is going to hurt you. So no matter what the situation may be, keep up your confidence and believe in yourself.

5.  The little things matter the most :

Keeping your guard up, bob and weave, pivoting your legs, hip movement, wrist alignment… all these are as important as throwing a punch, maybe even more ! Even in life, if we work on the little things the bigger goals seem easier.

.LOVE ♥.

 

 

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5 thoughts on “5 Things BOXING has taught me.

  1. My father(93) fought in NY PAL in teens. He hung with Sugar Ray who was 1 year older I think. Fought at least 2 three rounders a night and they paid him with a watch which he could sell for $10. His army duty 1943-44 was giving exhibition bouts in camps SE US and boxing instructor for 8th Armored Division. He was to fight in Madison Square Garden (middle weight) but mother insisted he quit so he still says “I traded one ring for another.” Thanks for your recent visit to my blog.

    Liked by 1 person

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